Wellpride FAQs

THE BASICS OF USING WELLPRIDE

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What is Wellpride?

Wellpride is a nutritional supplement made of fresh, pure, human-grade omega-3 fish oil, which contains the active ingredients EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid).  EPA and DHA are the long-chain and mature forms of omega-3 that are immediately and 100% usable by the body.  Ninety-five percent of the omega-3 research has been done using these important fatty acids. EPA and DHA are considered to be the workhorses of the omega-3 family.

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Is Wellpride a good source of energy?

Absolutely. As a horse owner, you supply energy to your horse in the form of his diet, choosing from a mix of carbohydrates, fats and proteins that are converted to chemical and mechanical energy. Although fats (oils) are not part of a horse's evolutionary diet, they are now accepted as a valuable addition, especially to competitive athletes.  They are considered a "cold" source of energy (meaning omega-3 fish oil fats do not make a horse unmanageable). The energy concentration in fat is about 2.5 times that of carbohydrates (fat offers 9 Kcal/g. of digestible energy), and researchers have shown that horses are able to digest and use up to 20% of their calories as oil if suitably introduced. The downside to this is that many horse owners end up adding fat in the form of processed feed or top-dressing corn oil, both of which contribute to our problem with too many omega-6s in the diet.

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How should Wellpride be given to horses?

The easiest way is to top-dress feed with Wellpride, because it doesn't smell nor taste fishy, horses love it (even most picky eaters). You can also administer the daily dosage directly into the mouth. Regardless of your method, the specially designed container of Wellpride allows the recommended daily one-ounce dose to be easily measured and poured.

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How long does it take to start seeing results?

Much like a field planted with a crop will take time to make it to the dinner table, so will it take time for you to see the full benefit of adding omega-3 to your horse's diet grow to fruition. Within the first month you will see skin and coat improve, often including the disappearance of any allergic dermatitis and flaky skin. In the second month, you should begin to see some overall improvement in the health of the horse, including appetite, alertness, and temperament. Over the third and fourth months, you will generally see marked improvement in hoof quality, a lessening of joint pain, an increase in fertility, and so on. The research is abundantly clear. To get these results takes two things: 1) daily consistency, and 2) adequate dosing for the issue about which you’re concerned.

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Can the daily maintenance dose be increased?

According to our experience, the recommended daily maintenance dosage for an average adult horse has been established in 4.5 g. of EPA and 3.0 g. of DHA, as is contained in one ounce of Wellpride. As with other supplements and medications, this amount may be adjusted for weight, with ponies and babies receiving a proportionally smaller dose and drafts receiving a larger dose. Researchers have shown that in some specific cases such as arthritis, the incorporation of EPA/DHA into the joint cell membranes by dietary supplementation results in a dose-dependent reduction of the affecting symptoms. Thus, in specific cases and in order to ameliorate the already existing inflammatory response the dosage may be increased without any side effect. 

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Should dosing be adjusted by weight or illness? 

Just like you would adjust dosing for other nutraceuticals, it's a good idea to adjust your Wellpride dosing for two reasons: effectiveness and economy. In human studies it has been made abundantly clear that there is a "tipping point" of sorts where the dose becomes effective. In other words, an average sized human with average health concerns will not see half the benefits if he takes half the recommended dose of fish oil - he'll probably see zero benefits. When he reaches the correct dose, the benefits will appear. However, if he is oversized or has certain health concerns, such as exercise-induced asthma or joint pain, certain benefits will appear only with double dosing. Short answer: it won't hurt to feed your horse more Wellpride.  However, economy would suggest you start off with one ounce daily for the average 1,000-1,200 pound horse, adjusting downward to perhaps 3/4 or 1/2 ounce for ponies or foals, and upward to 1 1/2 to 2 ounces for drafts and other big horses. Age or infirmity might also dictate higher doses, especially for joint concerns.

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How long do we need to keep horses on Wellpride?

This is not a pill that cures a sickness and it's over. Modern equine diets are lacking in omega-3 and overloaded with omega-6, with no end to this in sight. To keep filling that void and correcting the ratio, you'll need to keep supplementing your horse with adequate levels of omega-3, whether that is a large quantity of flaxseed oil or a small quantity of fish oil. 

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Can I save money by switching to Wellpride?

The good news is, if you're already spending money on other supplements and pharmaceuticals, you can often scale those back after a period of overlap. (If you are considering scaling back on pharmaceuticals, consult with your veterinarian first.) Here's an example from one of our employee's horses, an 18 year old, 1800 pound, slightly arthritic but still competing event horse. He was stabilized and sound and on a mix of supplements and shots.  After four months of Wellpride, she began experimenting with what could be dropped or reduced. Ten months after adding Wellpride, the horse was stabilized, sound and still competing on the new program (and she saved $60 a month). Plus a major bonus - his recovery rate was noticeably better after running cross-country, a benefit that the old program did not provide. OLD: $180 monthly double dose of Glucosamine supplement double dose of hoof supplement all-over joint wellness injection every 4 weeks. NEW: $120 monthly double dose of Wellpride all-over joint wellness injection every 6 weeks.

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Are there any contraindications to using Wellpride?

No. Wellpride is a natural product containing no preservatives and can be used in conjunction with any kind of medications and supplements. 

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Can you legally use Wellpride for race or competitive horse?

Despite the fact that it has many of the same pain relief and anti-inflammatory effects as highly powerful pharmaceuticals, there is absolutely no rule in any breed or sport against competing with Wellpride, nor would there be any reason to have such a ban. It is exactly as if you yourself ate a fish dinner the night before you ran in the Olympics. There's just nothing fishy about it!  Wellpride also helps your horse have a noticeably faster recovery after exertion. In fact, you would do well to double-dose your horse several days before his race or competition to ensure that he has an extra edge with respiration.  This will naturally leads to a better performance than he'd have otherwise.

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Is it necessary to keep Wellpride refrigerated?

It is a good way to keep the product, but it is not absolutely necessary. Keeping the container tightly closed in a cool place out of direct sunlight will normally be enough to keep it fresh.

 

HOW OMEGA-3 WORKS FOR HORSES

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What are essential fatty acids (EFAs)?

Essential Fatty Acids (EFAs) are called 'essential' because they must be ingested in the diet, as the body can't manufacture them.  There are two you need to be concerned with:omega-3 and omega-6.  As long as a minimal level of each are ingested, what's important is the ratio of one to the other.  While your horse does need somewhat more omega-6 than -3 even the best diets today are often delivering virtually zero -3 and scads more -6 than is necessary. 

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What is the difference between omega-3 and omega-6? 

Both are critical for different functions in the body, although when one is in short supply, the other is often called upon to fill in. (Although the job effectiveness is about as good as asking a carpenter to fill in as an electrician, good at their respective jobs, not so good when they switch.) For many body processes, omega-3 and omega-6 operate in a sort of yin and yang balance when ingested in a proper ratio. For example, omega-3 fights inflammation while omega-6 promotes it. The reason there is a need for omega-3 supplementation is that the modern industrialized diet has both decreased in omega-3 (through depletion of pasture) and increased in omega-6 (through processing of feed), throwing the ideal ratio way out of whack for not just people but their horses too.

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Why is it necessary for omega-6 to promote inflammation?

When your horse cuts himself or pulls a muscle, he has an inflammatory response, which is simply increased heat, redness, swelling, pain and an army of infection-fighting white blood cells. The purpose of this reaction is to eliminate toxic agents, irritants and damaged tissues, a good thing for a brief time. However, the body sometimes gets confused about what signals are harmful, and in some cases it can start attacking itself, as with arthritis and other auto-immune diseases. When omega-6 is not kept in check with sufficient omega-3 a state of chronic inflammation results. This in turn hastens and worsens arthritic and other inflammation-related symptoms.

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How does EPA and DHA control inflammation?

The research is abundantly clear that long-chain mature omega-3 is a superb inflammation and arthritis fighter without the gastrointestinal irritation and liver problems associated with NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs). Omega-3 specifically puts a damper on the inflammation response.  Inflammation happens when leukocytes and macrophages release several mediators with long hairy names like prostaglandin E2 and leukotriene B4. Redness, swelling, heat and pain associated to inflammation are the result. EPA promotes the formation of more soothing messengers to the body saying "All is well. No inflammatory response needed." DHA on the other hand, appears to be the more important one for enhancing brain function, fertility, and moderating blood pressure.

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How does flaxseed compared to fish oil in the omega-3 department? 

Fish oil is a far better source of omega-3. Here's why: Omega-3 from sources such as flaxseed is made of short-chain alpha-linolenic acids, or ALA. This immature form must be converted to the long-chain EPA/DHA (eicosapentaenoic acid / docosahexaenoic acid) form of omega-3 to be readily utilized by the body. Sounds fine, huh? Not really. Those overabundant omega-6s have once again caused problems. They block the transformation of ALA to EPA/DHA, and, on average, 90% of flaxseed omega-3 is lost in the conversion. If you instead feed the only viable source of ready-made EPA/DHA - fish oil - you can reduce the quantity of oil significantly. In fact, a horse taking just one ounce of Wellpride is taking the equivalent of one to two cups of flaxseed oil. Once you calculate the price per effective dose, you'll see that a quality fish oil (Wellpride, of course) is the easiest and most affordable way to get sufficient quantities of the right omega-3 into your horse. 

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What food sources naturally carry high quantities of essential fatty acids?

Omega-3 is available in short-chain immature form from vegetable sources such as flaxseed and walnuts, and in long-chain mature form from breast milk, fatty fish, and certain types of algae. Omega-6 is far more prevalent, as it is found in corn, sunflower, and safflower oils, and other staple ingredients of processed foods.

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Aren’t commercial horse feeds and many supplements already omega balanced?

No. The manufactured feeds most horses receive today contain an exorbitant amount of omega-6 (found in vegetable oils) and minimal omega-3. This is because omega-6 oils are stable and inexpensive, while omega-3 oils are more expensive and easily go rancid when exposed to air, making it difficult to include them in commercial feeds. Left unbalanced, this preponderance of omega-6 will create the worst problems, from extraordinary spookiness and attitude problems, to weak hooves, infertility, breathing and joint problems. On the supplement side, quite a few are labeled as "omega-balanced" with a blend of omega-3 and omega-6. If these were sole food sources, they'd be very helpful. As it is, the best they usually do is not add to the problem, but they don't fix the overall imbalance in the diet. Picture a teeter-totter, with a heavy kid (omega-6) anchoring one end on the ground and a light kid (omega-3) sky-high on the other end. Now picture adding a light kid to each end of the teeter totter (a "balanced" omega-3 and omega-6 supplement).  You've still failed to bring the board into balance.  In short, you cannot correct an imbalance with balance, you can correct it only by adding just what you're missing: pure omega-3.

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Horses are herbivores. Why should they eat fish?

Wellpride is not whole fish; it is only the fat from fish and thus contains no fish protein. Look at it this way, we feed our horses many things (such as corn oil, flaxseed oil, Glucosamine, and Lasix) they wouldn't ingest naturally in an attempt to aid modern genetic and environmental shortfalls. Strange as it may seem, feeding fish oil is one of the smartest things you can do to support foundational good health, so you can then potentially avoid the use of many other supplements and pharmaceuticals.

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Aren’t ailment-specific omega-3 supplements better for horses?

With fish oil quickly becoming the most doctor and veterinarian-recommended supplement worldwide, there has naturally been an attempt to improve upon nature, with engineered substances based on fish oil and other marine sources. These supplements generally offer high levels of either EPA or DHA, but not both. Our position is that a natural and high-quality fish oil free of over-processing will provide the full-spectrum benefit, with numerous synergies not found when you isolate and engineer only one fatty acid. This is looking at the fish oil itself. Similar synergies will be seen in a body treated for all its ills. For example, everyone knows that mental health affects physical health (a lame left fore will often lead to a lame right fore, and so on). By giving a full spectrum treatment to the full body, everything works better synergistically.